UNIO CUM CHRISTO ARTICLES

Vol. 3 No. 1 / Apr 2017


SACRED VIOLENCE AND JUSTIFICATION

PAUL WELLS - in Vol. 3 No. 1 / Apr 2017
Editorial: Sacred Violence and Justification

THE FIVE SOLAS OF THE REFORMATION: THEN AND NOW

GARRY J. WILLIAMS - in Vol. 3 No. 1 / Apr 2017
After a description of the five solas of the Protestant Reformation and their biblical basis, the rejection of the solas by the Roman Catholic Church at Trent and Vatican I is traced, focusing on revelation, justification, and worship. The account of Roman Catholic theology is brought up to date by an examination of changes that occurred at Vatican II. A different stance toward Protestants and the wider world is explained by a shift in the Church’s view of the nature-grace relationship.

WHAT HAS MUSSOLINI TO DO WITH HUS?

CARL R. TRUEMAN - in Vol. 3 No. 1 / Apr 2017
In this lecture to celebrate the launch of Unio cum Christo I propose to look at how the Italian fascist dictator Benito Mussolini approached the life and thinking of John Hus. It is no real surprise to find that someone like Mussolini would appropriate a figure like Hus. If you travel to Europe today, in Germany many statues of Martin Luther are on view, almost all from the nineteenth century.The rise of German nationalism fueled interest in Martin Luther, and in nineteenth-century Europe gener

BOUND, FREED, FREED TO BE BOUND: THE WITTENBERG UNDERSTANDING OF JUSTI CATION

ROBERT KOLB - in Vol. 3 No. 1 / Apr 2017
This essay focuses on the Wittenberg teaching on justification directly following the presentation of the Augsburg Confession in 1530. Martin Luther’s understanding of justification was based on Christ’s atoning work in dying to eradicate sin and guilt and in rising to restore righteousness to his people. The benefits of Christ are given through the pronouncement of forgiveness by the effective word of absolution in all forms, and appropriated through trust in the promise of Christ.

LUTHER AND ERASMUS: THE CENTRAL CONFRONTATION OF THE REFORMATION

JEAN-MARC BERTHOUD - in Vol. 3 No. 1 / Apr 2017
One of Martin Luther’s lasting achievements is his confrontation with Erasmus on the freedom of man’s will. After first absorbing the nominalistic semi-Pelagian synthesis consensus, Luther revolted against the intellectual and spiritual mediocrity of that prevailing system of thought by using Ockham’s logical razor and recovering biblical realism. The Bondage of the Will is the first confessional statement of the Reformation. Two opposing visions of reality emerge: Erasmus’s skepticism and semi-

AN INTRODUCTION TO LUTHER, CALVIN, AND THEIR PROTESTANT REFORMATIONS

PETER A. LILLBACK - in Vol. 3 No. 1 / Apr 2017
A comparison of Martin Luther and John Calvin shows that they stand in line with historic Christianity and share core Reformation principles. Abuses in the Catholic Church and indulgences are among the main reasons why Luther broke with the church in which he grew up. Luther gave the impetus for other Reformations and theological movements, in particular Zurich, represented by Heinrich Bullinger with his contribution to covenantal thought, and Geneva, where Calvin through his Institutes...

LUTHER AND THE SPANISH REFORMERS

FRANCES LUTTIKHUIZEN - in Vol. 3 No. 1 / Apr 2017
Few of the Spanish Reformers actually met Luther or the other Reformers in person. However, despite the drastic measures taken by the Spanish authorities to keep “Lutheran” literature from entering Spain, the Spanish Reformers were well versed in Luther’s writings. Prohibition engendered curiosity and curiosity a desire to learn more, which eventually led to acceptance of the Reformed faith, and in many cases martyrdom. This essay centers on early reactions to Luther and his message, the efforts

“THE GLORIOUS WORK OF THE REFORMATION”: ANDREW FULLER AND THE IMITATION OF MARTIN LUTHER

MICHAEL A. G. HAYKIN - in Vol. 3 No. 1 / Apr 2017
While a high view of the life and work of Martin Luther was maintained only in certain quarters of Anglophone Christianity by the close of the seventeenth century, the eighteenth-century Evangelical revival led to a profound rediscovery of him. This article examines the way one such Evangelical, the Baptist Andrew Fuller, who does not appear to have read Luther directly, regularly cited him as a model to be imitated when it came to preaching and courageous action.

LUTHER AND THE TURKS

HANS SCHWARZ - in Vol. 3 No. 1 / Apr 2017
Confronted with the military advance of the Turkish Ottoman Empire against the Holy Roman Empire, including the siege of Vienna, Martin Luther wrote several treatises on the Turks. Luther rejected the idea of a war in the name of religion against the Ottoman onslaught, seeing instead the defense of the Holy Roman Empire as the duty of the Emperor. Luther understood the Turkish threat as God’s punishment for the laxity of Christians and so called for repentance and a return to the gospel.

LUTHER AND THE REFORM OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY LIFE

YOUNGCHUN CHO - in Vol. 3 No. 1 / Apr 2017
Martin Luther was a reformer not only of Christian doctrines and church practices, but also of marriage and family life. This article investigates how Luther transformed the medieval concept of marriage and reconstructed family life as a sacred sphere in which the believer can exercise faith and Christian duties coram Deo, examining Luther’s criticism of celibacy, his view of sexuality and women, and his pastoral insights on the responsibilities of husbands in relation to wives and par...

THE PRIESTHOOD OF ALL BELIEVERS IN AFRICA

CONRAD MBEWE - in Vol. 3 No. 1 / Apr 2017
Protestant churches in Africa have come under scrutiny from political leaders due to the abuse that citizens in the churches suffer at the hands of their leaders. This is in part due to the loss of the doctrine of the priesthood of all believers taught in the Bible and rediscovered during the Protestant Reformation in the sixteenth century. We trace the discovery of this doctrine in the Reformation, its application to Africa, and its current absence, and we call church leaders to teach

DO JUDAISM, ISLAM, AND CHRISTIANITY WORSHIP THE SAME GOD? A REFORMED THEOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE

PHILIP TACHIN - in Vol. 3 No. 1 / Apr 2017
It is debated whether Judaism, Christianity, and Islam worship the same God. That they share the same roots in Abraham, the father of faith, makes some, including Christian scholars, conclude that they worship the same God. The question turns on the real substance of worship and its approval by God. Drawing from the classical Reformed view, we make a logical and exegetical argument that Judaism, Christianity, and Islam may have shared the same broad categories about their supreme...

TRANSHUMANISM: ANTHROPOLOGICAL CHALLENGE OF THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

YANNICK IMBERT - in Vol. 3 No. 1 / Apr 2017
Transhumanism is a philosophical and cultural movement that promotes human enhancement through advanced technological means such as nanotechnology. The philosophical characteristics of transhumanism, including the belief that human beings are modifiable at will, make it one of the most important anthropological challenges of the twenty-first century. This article introduces the main elements of transhumanism and highlights some possible apologetical interactions.

THE BLACK CHURCH’S RESPONSE TO THE RACIALIZATION OF ABORTION IN AMERICA

EMMITT CORNELIUS JR. - in Vol. 3 No. 1 / Apr 2017
The “racialization” of abortion in America is a concept that draws attention to the fact that blacks (and to a lesser extent, Latinos) are disproportionately represented by abortion statistics as a result of an aggressive racist agenda in America to control the black population through attrition. More so than any other institution, the black church is positioned to confront this crisis as its ministers reclaim their shepherding role to protect their community’s most vulnerable members.

A REVIEW AND EVALUATION OF J. RICHARD MIDDLETON, A NEW HEAVEN AND A NEW EARTH

G. K. BEALE - in Vol. 3 No. 1 / Apr 2017
Debates about eschatology have continued unabated in evangelical theology up until the present time. Among those debates is the issue about how much continuity there is between the present earthly age and the eternal age to come. Some see no continuity: when we die we are spiritually raised from a material earth and body to a nonmaterial heaven and body, and remain there forever. Others see a lot of continuity, sometimes so much that the only difference between the two ages is that there will be

INTERVIEW WITH DR. WILLIAM EDGAR

PETER A. LILLBACK - in Vol. 3 No. 1 / Apr 2017