Other Articles in
Vol. 5 No. 1 / Apr 2019

Editorial: Dr. Edward J. Young (1907–1968) by ALLAN M. HARMAN
The Canon of the Old Testament by WALTER C. KAISER JR.
Motifs and Old Testament Theology by BRYAN D. ESTELLE
On Finding the Theological Message of Old Testament Books: A Plea for Paying Attention to the Redemptive-Historical Context by GERT KWAKKEL
Too Many to Chose from? The English Translation Controversy by LANE KEISTER
The Torah of Eden and the Conception of Ishmael: Genesis 3:6 and 16:3–4 by RON BERGEY
The Paradigmatic Role of Genesis 3 for Reading Biblical Narrative about Desire by CEPHAS T. A. TUSHIMA
How the Dwelling Becomes a Tent of Meeting: A Theology of Leviticus by L. MICHAEL MORALES
The Immanuel Prophecy at the Crossroads of Exegesis, Hermeneutics, and Bible Translation by STEFAN FELBER
Divine Forgiveness in the Book of Jeremiah by H. G. L. (ERIC) PEELS
Reading Jonah Backwards: Reconsidering a Prophet’s Repentance by STEPHEN COLEMAN
Preaching Christ from Proverbs by IAIN DUGUID
Gerhard von Rad (1901–1971): A Reluctant Modernist’s Approach to Wisdom Literature by CHARLES KELLY TELFER
Interview with Bruce Waltke by Peter A. Lillback
BOOK REVIEW: Influential Old Testament Theologies by ANDREW T. ABERNETHY
Book Review: Richard Belcher Jr. Finding Favour in the Sight of God: A Theology of Wisdom Literature by JEONG KOO JEON
Book Review: Henri Blocher. Original Sin: Illuminating the Riddle? by PIERRE-SOVANN CHAUNY
Gregory A. Boyd. Cross Vision: How the Crucifixion of Jesus Makes Sense of Old Testament Violence by PAUL WELLS
Brent A. Strawn. The Old Testament Is Dying: A Diagnosis and Recommended Treatment by RICHARD P. BELCHER JR.
Pierre Courthial. A New Day of Small Beginnings by JEAN-MARC BERTHOUD

BOOK REVIEW: HENRI BLOCHER. ORIGINAL SIN: ILLUMINATING THE RIDDLE?

by PIERRE-SOVANN CHAUNY in Vol. 5 No. 1 / Apr 2019



In Original Sin: Illuminating the Riddle, Henri Blocher proposes to illuminate the riddle the doctrine of original sin presents. The introduction points out that the phenomenon of human evil raises three questions: “First, why is the perception of human evil generally accompanied by feelings of indignation, guilt or shame?” “Secondly, if humans are capable of so much evil, how is it that they also reach heights of heroism, performing admirable deeds of selfless service and devotion to the truth?” “Thirdly,” if the world owes its origin to a holy and wise Creator, “how can we face the apparent contradiction” resulting from “the presence and power of evil in human life?” (11–12).



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